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GUERLAIN FUTURA: BACK TO THE 1930s


Although some of Guerlain's bottle designs are well over 100 years old and are still on the market as a testament to the brand's durability and timelessness, Guerlain has nevertheless regularly updated its image to conform to changing tastes. Due to the advanced age of the brand, this year celebrating its 188th anniversary, there is a constant concern at Guerlain to not look like a museum or, even worse, something that has seen better days. In the last few years, Guerlain has been busy trimming its visual appearance to become more streamlined and uniform. The Shalimar atomizer got a sleeker shape by Jade Jagger in 2010, and in 2013, Maison Guerlain received a total makeover by cutting-edge New York architect Peter Marino. While the historic Art Nouveau shop area was largely left untouched, all unnecessary ornamentation was discarded, such as the richly decorated sucrier tester bottles. At the same time, a reinvigorated website and brand name logo were launched, both made with clean, minimalist lines.

When Guerlain released L'Homme Idéal, Shalimar Souffle de Parfum and Terracotta Le Parfum the following year, they all came with the geometric Futura font on the labels and boxes, which is the same font now used throughout Guerlain's website. The font was eventually extended to include the La Petite Robe Noire boxes. This font had already been used, in a slightly modified form, on the redesigned white labels for the Eaux Fraîches. In 2016, Guerlain's spray bottles for all masculine scents and most of the classic feminines, as well as the quadrilobe Parfum bottle, will be repackaged with the Futura font.



Originally conceived in 1927 by typeface designer Paul Renner, the Futura font favoured simple geometric forms: near-perfect circles, triangles and squares. The font became representative of visual elements of the Bauhaus design style, and has gained widespread popularity thanks to its air of efficiency and modernity. As Guerlain adopts this font today, it's actually a revival of a visual style that the brand employed extensively during the 1930s, for such creations as Vol de Nuit, Sous le Vent, the lantern bottle, the war bottle, and Coque d'Or. Today, Guerlain aficionados mainly know it from the watch-shaped Eau de Cologne bottle (1936), which was sold until the late 1990s.
(July 2016)


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