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ART NOUVEAU REVISITED


With the advent of Mon Guerlain, we find one of the brand’s most classic bottle designs coming into mainstream distribution, namely the quadrilobe bottle.

Designed in 1908 by Aimé Guerlain's brother Gabriel, initially for the perfume Rue de la Paix, the quadrilobe bottle was essentially a flat, shortened version of the square bottle, a standard bottle inspired by chemistry laboratory glassware. Around 1900, before Guerlain began to focus more intensely on bottle designs, all fragrances were sold in plain, uniform bottles like the square bottle. The quadrilobe bottle has mainly been known as the bottle for Jicky, but it was really a standard bottle itself, having contained most Guerlain fragrances.

Seen from above, the quadrilobe bottle’s stopper looks like a quatrefoil ("quadrilobe" in French). It has also been noted that the stopper is suggestive of a champagne cork. During the Art Nouveau period, designers often united curving, organic forms with more angular and geometric contours, and the quadrilobe bottle is an illustrative example of this, as is L'Heure Bleue's heart-shaped stopper bottle (1912). The quadrilobe bottle's original green velvet box, with its flowing, plant-like decoration, was distinctly Art Nouveau too.

For Mon Guerlain, the bottle is turned into a spray, with a clear plastic cap embellished with an embossed gold band. "An iconic bottle: a tribute to elegance and modern femininity," says Guerlain. Thanks to Angelina Jolie, who is the face of the marketing campaign, the quadrilobe bottle will soon achieve the fame it deserves!
(February 2017)


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